Modern Manual Therapy Blog - Manual Therapy, Videos, Neurodynamics, Podcasts, Research Reviews
Chronic Complaints, Rapid Results - themanualtherapist.com

In this episode, Andrew goes over some surprisingly rapid results from a simple pattern recognition and reset based treatment. It's one of the cornerstones of Modern Manual Therapy. Remember, chronicity of complaints, doesn't have to equal persistent pain states.


Untold Physio Stories is sponsored by

EDGE Health and Tech Solutions - we level up your website with full SEO optimization, turn it into a referral generating machine and do full G Suite and Telehealth integrations - find out more at

Modern Manual Therapy Insiders - over 650 Exclusive videos, Research Reviews, Webinars, Online Discussion - learn easy to apply Clinical Practice Patterns, integrate Pain Science with Manual Therapy and Patient Education

Also, be sure to check out EDGE Mobility System's Best Sellers - Something for every PT, OT, DC, MT, ATC or Fitness Minded Individual
Keeping it Eclectic...

Sports Physical Therapy and Nutrition - themanualtherapist.com


Sports Nutrition

One of the hottest terms in the last decade: sports nutrition. Ask any exercise scientists, personal trainer, or athletic trainer, and they will say that sports nutrition has become a booming topic of interest and a huge market. Physios may be behind the curve a bit on this topic, so we thought we'd offer a nice review of sports nutrition specific to sports physical therapy practice.

For PTs, the 3 main areas of sports nutrition we should be focused on would include:

  1. Recovery
  2. Immunonutrition
  3. Performance enhancement

Let's dive into each of these and see what PTs need to consider from a dietary perspective.

Recovery

Helping athletes rehabilitate after an injury is an important role of a sports physio -- but what about recovering from resistance training, practice, or competition? Recovering from training and competition can translate into athletes gaining more strength, playing better, and maybe even preventing injuries. PTs can help their athletes gain an edge in recovery with simple dietary changes.

Many authors and athletes alike cite the 3Rs after training; a time when rehydration, refueling (carbohydrate), and repair (3R) takes major priority.

  • Rehydration protocols vary depending on the length of the event, the intensity of the exercise, and the specific athlete. Weighing in/out can help a PT guide an athlete in the best rehydration.
  • Refueling carbohydrates is low hanging fruit. No seriously, fruit is likely the best carbohydrate refueling food for athletes. It's rich in carbs, good in fiber, and chock full of antioxidants, which may also help with repair. Exercise, especially resistance training, induces micro-tearing and minute inflammation, which is normal and good. However, if such damage and inflammation is unabated, it can mean more pain, reduced performance, or even injury. Fruit is likely the best functional food to help with repairing tissues, with cherries, citrus, watermelon, and berries standing out as the best.

We extensively cover the research and dosing of such fruits to optimize recovering from delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMs) and training in our third course, Specialized Nutrition for PTs (SNP).  Let's move onto the next subject: keeping athletes from getting sick!

Immunonutrition

When athletes train and compete at high volumes and intensity their immune system can become compromised. With a drop in immune system function, athletes are more prone to catch upper respiratory infections and other issues. Fortunately, nutrition can help to mitigate this drop in immune function and keep athletes training, a topic known as immunonutrition.

Several dietary factors can help improve an athlete's immunonutrition, and they are:

  1. Maintaining hydration. Saliva and mucous membranes contain defensins, which help to combat infection. When a person is dehydrated these defensins cannot function as well.
  2. Consume fruit! Study after study has highlighted how consuming berries, cherries, and other fruits rich in Vitamin C can help reduce infections like colds, coughs, and sinus problems.
  3. Consume protein-rich foods spread throughout the day. Studies show that spreading protein-rich foods throughout the day, and especially right after training or competition, can help athletes maintain lean muscle mass. Keeping lean muscle mass on an athlete helps to mitigate a catabolic state, which can depress the immune system. Protein-rich foods does not mean meat; in fact, consuming plant-based sources of protein can be just as effective as animal-sources of protein!
  4. Maintain carbohydrate status. Long competitions and training bouts can deplete glycogen stores and stress the immune system. Repleting carb stores should be done during training and competition and most definitely immediately after exercise.
  5. Supplements. From probiotics to colostrum, a wide range of supplements offer conflicting data on boosting an athlete's immune system. We dive into this debate further in our online continuing education courses for rehabilitation professionals and PTs.

Let's move on to our last section, which is a major topic in any locker room or sidelines!

Performance Enhancement

Most athletes are looking for an edge in training and competition. They often seek the guidance of the team strength coach, personal trainer, head coach, or other fellow athletes. Some of these team members may pass-along how certain nutrients, supplements or other foods can help boost performance. This information can be evidenced-based, but often it may be just a fad or obtained from poorly researched sources like social media or the internet. A sports PT can help clear the air and provide excellent patient education when he or she is well-informed on dietary performance enhancement. 

We cover an extensive supplement and dietary review of the evidence for performance enhancement in our 3rd course; to cover the entire content here would take consider space and times. Let's outline some highlights of this data:

  1. Similar to the immunonutrition data, protein consumption is important to enhancing performance. Probably the premiere article for performance enhancement and protein would be the Schoenfeld et al meta-analysis on protein timing post-workout. This article refuted the need for "timing" protein to optimize muscle mass or strength. It appears that consumption of 5-6 meals/snacks with at least 20 grams of protein showed promising results for many athletes wishing to gain lean muscle mass and strength. 
  2. Training under varying amounts of carbohydrate availability may help athletes push through difficult bouts of competition. The exact methods of "training low" vs "training high" depends on the athlete and the sport.
  3. Two "supplements" that stand out within the literature are caffeine and creatine monohydrate. Caffeine can help reaction times, boost power performance, and increase weight lifted. Caffeine can be ingested as a pill, gum, or beverage, such as tea or coffee, which may other positive health benefits. Creatine monohydrate also shows very promising data: it can boost power output in athletes, increasing sprint time and weight lifted. Adding this supplement into an athlete's regime is fairly cheap and has minimal side effects
  4. Functional foods are another hot topic for athletes. Nitrates in beets, arugula, and fennel have been shown to increase nitric oxide compounds in the body. Such compounds can promote vasodilation and improve perfusion of muscle tissues; increasing the blood flow is likely why athletes that use these functional foods have better endurance, sprint velocities, and lower fatigue rates.

Conclusion

Understanding functional foods, supplements, and solid sports nutrition can help sports physical therapists better help their athletes recover and perform. From boost their immune system after a hard competition to recovering from training session, sports physios have a role in educating their athletes and also knowing when to refer an athlete to a sport dietician or team physician. 

Get certified in Nutritional Physical Therapy Online! Earn your CNPT - get started today!



Keeping it Eclectic...

5+ Risk Factors for BPPV - themanualtherapist.com


Have you ever got the spins? 🥴😵

Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo is one of the most common types of vestibular vertigo accounting for 17-42% of all patients diagnosed with vertigo.
It's Ok to Feel Pain - themanualtherapist.com



One of the main messages Erson has been trying to get across to patients, especially active ones, is that it's ok to feel pain. He recounts two recent athletes, one of whom this was just the right message, and another that needed a bit more work to get back to sport. 

  

Untold Physio Stories is sponsored by


EDGE Health and Tech Solutions - we level up your website with full SEO optimization, turn it into a referral generating machine and do full G Suite and Telehealth integrations


Modern Manual Therapy Insiders - over 650 Exclusive videos, Research Reviews, Webinars, Online Discussion - learn easy to apply Clinical Practice Patterns, integrate Pain Science with Manual Therapy and Patient Education


Also, be sure to check out EDGE Mobility System's Best Sellers - Something for every PT, OT, DC, MT, ATC or Fitness Minded Individual 



Keeping it Eclectic...



As a physical therapist, you HAVE to get over your issue with sales. And here’s how.

5 Types of Fallacies You Should Be Aware Of Part 2 - themanualtherapist.com


Last week, the topic of logical fallacies was introduced with 5 common errors that occur with clinical reasoning and deductive thinking.

This week, 5 more fallacies are presented that you will often see writers or readers intentionally or unintentionally perform with citing research.

5 Types of Fallacies to be Aware of by Cameron Faller


👉Begging the Question - This fallacy occurs when an argument's premises assume the truth instead of supporting it. This in turn creates circular reasoning as the argument is used to support the conclusion.

👉Correlation/Causation - This is one of the most common fallacies noted in randomized controlled trials. Just because something is highly correlated, doesn't mean that one causes the other. If this were the case, then one could argue that when Nicolas Cage stars in a film causes more people to drown in pools. (https://www.statsmedic.com/correlation-does-not-mean-causation)

👉Anecdotal Evidence - In place of highly driven evidence, this fallacy replaces a person's experience or one new piece of evidence as superior.

👉Middle Ground Fallacy - This fallacy assumes a compromise between two statements is always true. This ignores the fact that one of the statements could be completely true or false.

👉Burden of Proof - This occurs when someone renders a statement as true and will state it's true unless proven otherwise. For a point to be true, evidence would need to be able to support it.

👬Know someone who might find this helpful? Tag or share!

“The Devil is in the Details” 

Learn more online - new online discussion group included!


Want an approach that enhances your existing evaluation and treatment? No commercial model gives you THE answer. You need an approach that blends the modern with the old school. 
  • NEW - Online Discussion Group
  • Live cases
  • webinars
  • lecture
  • Live Q&A
  • over 600 videos - hundreds of techniques and more! 
  • Check out MMT Insiders
Keeping it Eclectic...

 

Training with Pain: Modifying Lifts in the Barbell Athlete - themanualtherapist.com

The latest Eclectic Approach Webinar sign up is live! Sign up for Training with Pain: Modifying Lifts in the Barbell Athlete, Oct 29th 8 pm EST.\
Each webinar has limited seats available, and replays links will be provided if you miss it live!


Training the basic barbell lifts such as the squat, bench press, and deadlift are great ways to increase strength, but when done suboptimally, injuries can occur. In this webinar, you will learn the basic framework for how to help these patients reduce pain and improve function. Webinar hosted by Dr. Michael Mash of Barbell Rehab and Dr. E.

Join us for a 1-hour webinar where you will learn:
  • A 4-step decision making guideline for how to optimize and modify the barbell lifts
  • How to adjust programming variables such as volume, intensity, and frequency to reduce pain
  • How to utilize the principle of linear progression for rehabbing a barbell athlete

Make sure to sign up by clicking the button below!



Learn more online - new online discussion group included!


Want an approach that enhances your existing evaluation and treatment? No commercial model gives you THE answer. You need an approach that blends the modern with the old school. 
  • NEW - Online Discussion Group
  • Live cases
  • webinars
  • lecture
  • Live Q&A
  • over 600 videos - hundreds of techniques and more! 
  • Check out MMT Insiders
Keeping it Eclectic...

Healthcare clinicians aren’t, or at least, shouldn’t be remained to patient facing roles. In fact, there are three primary career tracks that providers and organizations should consider when mapping out plans for career development.