Myths of Manual Therapy Part 1: Soft Tissue | Modern Manual Therapy Blog

Myths of Manual Therapy Part 1: Soft Tissue


I am trying out a new Microsoft Product called sway, it's like pretzi, but auto formats to each device, mobile, tablet, pc, very easy to use, and built to share!

Below is a sway I did on Myths of Manual Therapy: Soft Tissue - if you find the information useful, or want to spread the word, please share the sway or this blog post! Hit full screen or scroll through this with your mouse or your finger if using a smartphone or tablet!

Keeping it Eclectic...

12 comments:

  1. Not working very well with Chrome 43.023

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  2. I understand deep scar tissue can not be affected by aggressive topical massage, but what about a superficial scar after surgery or an accident causing a large scar?

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  3. Nope! Those forces were for superficial fascia, not even scar tissue. Don't worry, just go lighter and you'll still make changes.

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  4. Thanks, I have adopted your rule of never causing pain for any reason, but what I am getting at is it even possible to effect or make changes in a superficial scar with any sort of massage.

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  5. It's not been proven and it's pretty doubtful based on studies using excessive force. Cadaver studies don't count unless you treat dead people.

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  6. So are you saying scar mobilization after surgery is not helping the scar tissue loosen up and prevent fibrosis? This is also a neurological change?

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  7. At best you're probably improving skin mobility, or possibly sliding between fascial layers. Pretty sure much of that research is done on cadavers so unless you treat the walking dead, probably not applicable. I'm not saying Mobility isn't important, but when we improve mobility rapidly at any time it's most neurophysiologic.

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  8. I think these are great points and thoughts. One thing I have always thought would be a great research topic for the mechanisms of soft tissue manual therapy would be to look at the fibroblasts and fibroclasts of a given connective tissue. We understand that by performing soft tissue manual therapy we create a neurologic effect through input into the nervous system (as you said threatening or non-threatening). Is it possible that we also create soft tissue effect through stimulation of cells such as fibroblasts and fibroclasts, so that we are perhaps not physically deforming tissue, but may have the capability, over time, to stimulate tissue change by causing fibroclasts to consume "tighter" collagen, and fibroblasts to create longer stretchier fibers. I think that this would be possible with a home program such as daily foam rolling and stretching, especially when we consider the role of Wolf's law. No evidence to back this up, but just interesting thoughts to consider I think.

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  9. It is often misunderstood when I say it is not possible to physically deform fascia or scar tissue. But in the long run, say 6-8 weeks, tissues adapt to repeated stress/stimulation and do change. Your explanation of mechanism is as good as any I've heard. It's just that most conditions improve much more rapidly than how long it takes for actual tissues to change.

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  10. Melissa HernandezJuly 24, 2015 at 4:10 PM

    Just out of curiosity, what are your thoughts on this article?

    Visceral mobilization can lyse and prevent peritoneal adhesions in a rat model.
    Bove GM, Chapelle SL.
    J Bodyw Mov Ther. 2012 Jan;16(1):76-82. doi: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2011.02.004. Epub 2011 Apr 9.
    PMID: 22196431

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  11. Animal studies are not applicable to humans. I wouldn't do visceral mobilization anyway. If you can't break up superficial fascia forget visceral. Just my take.

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