Is Mindfulness for Everyone? | Modern Manual Therapy Blog

Is Mindfulness for Everyone?


Walk into a bookshop and you cannot help but notice the ever-increasing number of books about mindfulness filling the shelves, which begs the question, is mindfulness for everyone?
In my opinion, mindfulness is a practice that everyone could choose to incorporate into their lives, however, not everyone will wish to make that choice. It is also the case that the route to mindful practice can be different for different people. For example, sitting or lying and being mindful or meditating can be result in greater suffering in some circumstances and hence that person needs something else at that time. An individual suffering PTSD for instance, could discover that mindful practice leads to a greater state of stress and anxiety. There are several possible reasons for this, including whether they have been instructed in the right way about what mindfulness really is and how we go about the practice. With so many people offering mindfulness at the moment, it can be difficult to know who best to listen to or follow.
Starting any new practice is a challenge and requires dedication and perseverance. In so doing, one learns and realises that each moment there is an opportunity to get better at what you are doing. As Ajahn Brahm says, ‘there’s no such thing as a bad meditation’ — we can always take something from the practice, and the fact that you have practiced has created a learning opportunity. Sometimes the practice results in a great feeling of serenity as the inner dialogue quietens, and sometimes the voice chunters away. Good? Bad? It is what you think it is!
Mindfulness is simply about being aware of your thoughts, feelings and sensations as they pass by, which they always do. The realisation of impermanence is an important one as moments continuously flow. Noticing what you are thinking and feeling without judgement means that you begin to see things for what they are and the causes of your, and other’s suffering. This insight is invaluable for our health. One is tempted to say emotional health but this would suggest some kind of separation between body and mind. There can be no separation between body and mind as we are a whole person living experiences that are unified of cognition, perception and action. The practices of mindfulness provide a way of ‘doing’ this, although really when being mindful, we are not actually doing anything other than being aware, using our attention. To add compassion to this means that you have the intention to be kind to others and yourself with all the accompanying health benefits from positive social interactions and kindness to self.
Mindfulness is a practice with several straightforward methods (below), which is why it is accessible to all. However, actual practicing is the challenge as we have so many existing habits of thought. Our minds do wander and are filled with chaotic thoughts that inform feelings, emotions, actions and perceptions, yet all of these dimensions inform each other. This complexity defines the challenge and how one day we can quieten down the inner chat and another day it seems to make no difference. Remembering that it is not the thought or series of thoughts that is the issue, instead it is recognising that this is the content of the mind, which is not me per se. I am not the contents of my mind, and being able to realise that is hugely empowering.
Two common practices are mindful breathing and mindful walking, both if which are accessible at any moment to most. Paying attention to what arises in this moment is at the essence of the practice that develops one’s ability to focus, choose what to attend to, to reappraise a thought pattern, see things for what they are, realise that anger or another emotion is present yet you can remain focused on your intention. Keeping a focus on your intention is a great skill demonstrated at a time when an argument ensues. Instead of emotional reactions with hurtful words, maintaining a course for the intention that is usually a kind action towards another, you listen deeply and understand the other party, allowing for effective communication towards a resolution. Be able to see the reasons for the other person’s actions provides great opportunity for transforming the situation. This would be a good example of using mindfulness and compassion, the two differing.
Returning to the primary question, I believe that mindful practices can be integrated practically into people’s day to day living if the person makes the choice to do so. Potentially, this is the case for anyone. However, each person needs good instruction and guidance, in essence to become their own coach to transform their inner dialogue to one of kindness and compassion toward self and others. Mindfulness creates the awareness within which this can happen through attention training (mindfulness is about attention whereas compassion is my motivation or intention ~ there’s a difference). Some will need other ways into the regular practice by using breathing and movement, some will need different explanations to be guided and supported, but the the aim is always to develop ways to reduce suffering.
Mindfulness practice is a part of the Pain Coach Programme for overcoming pain | contact us by email: painphysiolondon@gmail.com or call us 07518 445493


Interested in live cases where I apply this approach and integrate it with pain science, manual therapy, repeated motions, IASTM, with emphasis on patient education? Check out Modern Manual Therapy!

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